Traps to Avoid in Staff Selection

Hiring an employee is what makes or breaks a company.  Companies who invest in getting the right people tend to become financially successful, have less turnovers, and have an overall better reputation compared to their closest competitors.  This is why hiring managers should avoid getting tripped into one of these hiring traps. 

Hiring someone who does not fit the culture

The new employee may have the skills that match what your company wants, but if the employee refuses to adapt the organization’s culture, it would be difficult to establish relationships between co-workers and may cause friction among your people.  It would be much of a heartache if the company fires an employee because of a mismatched culture compared to firing someone because he is absent all the time.

Hiring an employee who are like the hiring manager

Hiring people whom hiring managers feel a special bond or friendship with is not always the best people to fill a job.  It is the common mistake for recruiters to hire employees that appear to be nice and mingle with the recruiters well, but do not have enough skills to accomplish the tasks at hand. 

This creates a negative impression towards the hiring manager’s sense of judgment, as he or she looks at new employees through rose-colored glasses.  Instead, companies should look for a prospective employee who fit the job requirements.

Lowering your hiring standards

If the hiring manager has been looking for the right employee far too long, he or she may not be able to resist the temptation of lowering the hiring standards just to employ someone.  If managers settle for less, they might have to suffer for years as they fill the organization with under-performing employees or resentful co-workers. 

If recruiters have a hard time searching for the right employee, perhaps they need to revise their hiring strategies. They can seek other job search websites or put up some creative strategies within the workplace like job sharing, job rotations, and internships.

Lack of consideration that there may be someone better

A hiring manager likes to hire a particular employee so much, but he received a referral of another prospective employee who is deemed to be a better employee.  It would be a grave mistake for the recruiter to ditch off the reference and continue with the hiring of the employee whom the managers "like."

 
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