Being Paid for Not Working

Part of working within an organization includes having to abide a set of rules to prevent you from being penalized.  However, you also need to know office rules that would be advantageous to you, especially when something happens and you did not attend to work. 

As an employee, you actually have the right to be paid for time you do not spend working for your employer.  According to the Federal Law, you are entitled to earn a salary for the time you spend under your employer’s benefits or for your employer’s control, even though you are not performing your responsibilities.  Here are some of the situations when you may have the right to be paid even if you did not work in the company at all.

On-call time

If you spend your time in the office waiting for a work assignment, your employer must pay you for that time.  Meanwhile, if you are on call elsewhere, you are entitled for payment on hours that you have little or no control and which you cannot use for your own enjoyment or benefit.  If your employer, for instance, places significant restrictions on you when you are on call, you can be entitled for pay especially if you get called into work fairly often.

Sleep time

Employees are entitled to be paid for the time they are allowed to sleep during a shift.  However, if you should attend a shift of more than 24 hours at a time, you and your employer may agree to consider eight of those hours as unpaid time for meals and sleep periods.  Meanwhile, if you end up working during that unpaid period, or you are unable to get at least five hours of sleep due to work conditions, your employer must pay you for those eight hours.

Travel time

You are not generally entitled to pay for the time you spend commuting to and from work everyday.  However, you are entitled to be paid for travel time if that time period is part of the job.  Even if traveling is not part of your job, your employer must pay you for the travel time you are required to come to workplace at odd hours in case of emergency situations.

Training and education

If you are required by the company to attend a lecture, meeting, or a training session, you are entitled to be paid for that time spent; including the time you spend traveling to an off-site event.

 
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